Filing your corporate tax return in the Netherlands

This information is provided by

Tax and Customs Administration, Belastingdienst

Private or public limited companies (bv or nv) in the Netherlands have to file a corporate or corporation income tax return (vpb, vennootschapsbelasting in Dutch) every year. You file your tax declaration after closing your company’s fiscal year. Some foundations and associations also have to file corporate income tax returns. The Dutch Tax Administration uses the return to determine your tax assessment: will you have to pay tax, or get a tax refund?

Dutch branch or subsidiary If your company is foreign-based, with a branch or subsidiary in the Netherlands, you will be liable for corporate income tax on the income received by the Dutch subsidiary. However, it is possible for parent-daughter companies to establish a so-called fiscal unity, which enables them to level out negative results from one constituent of the fiscal unity with the positive results from another (or others).

Check your provisional assessment

At the start of the fiscal year you receive a provisional assessment from the Dutch Tax and Customs Administration. The amount of this assessment is calculated based on data provided in previous years. Check the provisional assessment. Do you expect a fall or rise in taxable profit, different from what is stated in the assessment? You can request an adaptation of your provisional assessment (wijziging van uw voorlopige aanslag, in Dutch). You can also request an adaptation if you disagree with the assessment. You cannot file an objection to the provisional assessment, only to the final assessment.

File your corporation income tax return

Is your fiscal year the same as the calendar year? Then you have to file your return before 1 June of each year. There are different rules for broken and shortened fiscal years (in Dutch).

You have to file your return even if you haven’t received a provisional assessment. If you don’t file your return in time, the Tax and Customs Administration may impose an administrative fine.

You can file your tax return in one of three ways:

  • By submitting it online through the Tax and Customs Administration website (Inloggen voor Ondernemers, in Dutch). You will receive the required logon data once you have registered with the Netherlands Chamber of Commerce, if your business is established in the Netherlands.
  • Using software applications from commercial companies. For this option Standard Business Reporting (SBR) is the only way.
  • By outsourcing your corporation tax return work to an intermediary, such as a payroll manager, an accountant or a tax consultant.
Are you a foreign tax payer for corporation tax, with no access to 'Inloggen voor Ondernemers'? Then fill out the paper declaration for foreign taxpayers for corporate income tax sent to you by the Dutch Tax and Customs Administration.

Apply for a filing extension

You can apply for a filing extension (a delay) in two ways: You’ll receive a reply form the Tax and Customs Administration within 3 weeks. The standard delay is 5 months. Do you need a longer extension? Then you must state your reasons for the longer delay on the form.

Object to the final assessment

If you disagree with a final assessment or an additional assessment, you can file an objection (Dutch only).

Tip: make use of the services of a Dutch consultant

A consultant who is proficient in Dutch can be a big help when dealing with your corporation tax return. A consultant can help you draw up and file your return, once you authorise them.

Check the corporate tax rates for the Netherlands

Check the rates for corporate tax for 2020 and the years before (in Dutch).

Use tax schemes

Make use of tax reduction schemes. They allow you to deduct a sum from your taxable profit. That way, you pay less taxes. Examples of tax deduction schemes are the KIA, EIA and MIA.

Changes in corporate tax

The Corporate Tax Act is subject to changes. Check the Dutch Tax and Customs Administration information (in Dutch) regularly to find out the up-to-date rates and rules.

This information is provided by

Tax and Customs Administration, Belastingdienst